TeX Live 2016 pretest and Debian packages

Preparation for the release of TeX Live 2016 have started some time ago with the freeze of updates in TeX Live 2015. Yesterday we announced the official start of the pretest period. That means that we invite people to test the new release and help fixing bugs. At the same time I have uploaded the first set of packages of TeX Live 2016 for Debian to the experimental suite.

texlive-2016-debian-pretest

Concerning the binaries we do expect a few further changes, but hopefully nothing drastic. The most invasive change on the tlmgr side is that cryptographic signatures are now verified to guarantee authenticity of the packages downloaded, but this is rather irrelevant for Debian users (though I will look into how that works in user mode).

Other than that, many packages have been updated or added since the last Debian packages, here is the unified list:

acro, animate, appendixnumberbeamer, arabluatex, asapsym, asciilist, babel-belarusian, bibarts, biblatex-bookinarticle, biblatex-bookinother, biblatex-caspervector, biblatex-chicago, biblatex-gost, biblatex-ieee, biblatex-morenames, biblatex-opcit-booktitle, bibtexperllibs, bxdvidriver, bxenclose, bxjscls, bxnewfont, bxpapersize, chemnum, cjk-ko, cochineal, csplain, cstex, datetime2-finnish, denisbdoc, dtx, dvipdfmx-def, ejpecp, emisa, fithesis, fnpct, font-change-xetex, forest, formation-latex-ul, gregoriotex, gzt, hausarbeit-jura, hyperxmp, imakeidx, jacow, l3, l3kernel, l3packages, latex2e, latex2e-help-texinfo-fr, latex-bib2-ex, libertinust1math, lollipop, lt3graph, lua-check-hyphen, lualibs, luamplib, luatexja, mathalfa, mathastext, mcf2graph, media9, metrix, nameauth, ndsu-thesis, newtx, normalcolor, noto, nucleardata, nwejm, ocgx2, pdfcomment, pdfpages, pkuthss, polyglossia, proposal, qcircuit, reledmac, rmathbr, savetrees, scanpages, stex, suftesi, svrsymbols, teubner, tex4ebook, tex-ini-files, tikzmark, tikzsymbols, titlesec, tudscr, typed-checklist, ulthese, visualtikz, xespotcolor, xetex-def, xetexko, ycbook, yinit-otf.

Enjoy.

Email this to someonePrint this pageShare on FacebookShare on Google+Tweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedInFlattr the author

CJK fonts and Ghostscript: cjk-gs-integrate release 20160115.0

I have made a new release of cjk-gs-integrate, the script that searches for all kind of CJK fonts, and makes them available to Ghostscript (and if asked for also to TeX by linking). The update has been uploaded to CTAN (link) and it will land in TeX Live within the next days.

cjk-ghostscript

Changes made in this version are mostly related to link handling and removal:

  • fix link names of otf font links
  • safer remove option
  • ensure that we don’t create circular links

For more explanations concerning how to run cjk-gs-integrate, please see the dedicated page: CJK fonts and Ghostscript integration.

For feedback and bug reports, please use the github project page.

Enjoy.

Email this to someonePrint this pageShare on FacebookShare on Google+Tweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedInFlattr the author

Japanese TeX User Meeting – Support for Japanese in TeX (Live) – present state and future?

Tomorrow the Japanese TeX User Meeting 2015 will be held in Tokyo. Since I have come to Japan I have attended more or less every year this meeting, and in 2013 we could get the (international) TeX User Group Meeting to Tokyo and had a joint conference TUG 2013, which was a great success.

(update 2015-11-09: slides added at the end)

Japanese-TeX
During tomorrows meeting I will give a talk on Support for Japanese in TeX (Live) – present state and future?:

The support for typesetting Japanese in TeX, in particular TeX Live, has been improved over the last few years considerably, so that at the current point we can ask ourselves – what is next? This talk reviews a bit of the history of Japanese typesetting support in TeX Live, and discusses future development directions.

For those interested, here is a bit of an extended abstract. Continue reading

Email this to someonePrint this pageShare on FacebookShare on Google+Tweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedInFlattr the author

Updates for OSX 10.11 El Capitan: cjk-gs-integrate and jfontmaps 20151002.0

Now that OSX 10.11 El Capitan is released and everyone is eagerly updating, in cooperation with the colleagues from the Japanese TeX world we have released new versions of the jfontmaps and cjk-gs-integrate packages. With these two packages in TeX Live, El Capitan users can take advantage of the newly available fonts in the Japanese TeX engines ((u)ptex et al), and directly in Ghostscript.

cjk-ghostscript

For jfontmaps the changes were minimal, Yusuke Terada fixed a mismatch in ttc index numbers for some fonts. Without this fix, Hiragino Interface is used instead of HiraginoSans-W3 and -W6.

On the other hand, cjk-gs-integrate has seen a lot more changes:

  • add support for OSX 10.11 El Capitan provided fonts (by Yusuke Terada)
  • added 2004-{H,V} encodings for Japanese fonts (by Munehiro Yamamoto)
  • fix incorrect link name – this prevented kanji-config-updmap from the jfontmaps package to find and use the linked fonts
  • rename --link-texmflocal to --link-texmf [DIR] with an optional argument
  • add a --remove option to revert the operation – this does clean up completely only if the same set of fonts is found

For more explanations concerning how to run cjk-gs-integrate, please see the dedicated page: CJK fonts and Ghostscript integration.

For feedback and bug reports, please use the github project pages: jfontmaps, cjk-gs-support.

Both packages should arrive in your local TeX Live CTAN repository within a day or two.

We hope that with this users of El Capitan can use their fonts to the full extend.

Enjoy.

Email this to someonePrint this pageShare on FacebookShare on Google+Tweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedInFlattr the author

jfontmaps release 20150923.0

After a year without a release we finally pushed out a new version of the Japanese font maps. The main addition is support for the fonts shipped in the upcoming El Capitan OSX release, which brings a whole new set of Hiragino fonts, most of them in Truetype collections.

The update is available from CTAN and will be in TeX Live within one or two days.

For suggestions and improvements, please use the issue system at the github development place.

Email this to someonePrint this pageShare on FacebookShare on Google+Tweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedInFlattr the author

In Memoriam Adrian Frutiger

Just a few days ago another great font designer has passed away, Adrian Frutiger, 24 May 1928 — 10 September 2015. Famous in particular for his fonts Frutiger, Avenir, and the Univers family. His fonts are used throughout the worlds for visual communication like road signs. Much has been written about him: Linotype’s excellent obituary, Adam Twardoch, David Airey, New York Times article. For an interview conducted with Frutiger in 1999, see this Eye Magazine article. An interesting article on Frutiger’s typefaces by Charles Bigelow.
frutiger1

Here I want to recall a different quality of Adrian Frutiger – his interest in the visual language of symbols, their development and interaction. His book “Der Mensch und seine Zeichen” (Signs and Symbols) is a profound study on the development, history, and use of all kind of symbols. Continue reading

Email this to someonePrint this pageShare on FacebookShare on Google+Tweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedInFlattr the author

The sins of the past – adding Cyrillic glyphs without renaming fonts

The URW Base35 fonts are a great set of fonts, available for free as in free software. They have been part of various distributions and systems since long time. Big thanks to URW for their work. But these fonts don’t have Cyrillic or Greek glyphs. Be it as it is, world would be easy. People would need to use different fonts for these languages. Comes around someone who did the unthinkable – namely adding the Cyrillic and Greek glyphs to the fonts (by now nothing bad), but then NOT renaming the fonts. Here we see one point of the stupidity of GPL and absolute freedom. Because what we now have is that documents produced several TeX engines (in particular XeTeX and LuaTeX) which use fontconfig to search the fonts, suddenly pick up these changed fonts that fake their identity, and what comes out is this, a complete rubbish:

broken-fonts

And now we are suffering huge pain from that. Look at the bug reports of that are coming in:

  • 796120 xdvipdfmx broken
  • 789391 developers reference fonts broken
  • 787759 fonts broken in dblatex

Just to name a few. And there is a simple way to circumvent this: Don’t install gsfonts which guarantees that fontconfig finds the real original URW fonts within the TeX Live tree first.

I have now spent many hours to track down these problems, find the reason, and at the end of the day there is always gsfonts with its broken fonts with added Cyrillic glyphs. I honestly don’t care about the history, there are now many fonts with Cyrillic and Greek glyphs, there is no need to fake fonts, and incorrectly take over font names.

This should be a lesson to all the GPL zealots that require absolute freedom of each and everything. Unfortunately things don’t work like that. Using AND RENAMING is ok, the Knuth license as I would say, but anything else is just a source of much pain.

End for today, I have to go to work now. Real work instead of fighting sins of the past.

Nothing to enjoy here.

Additional information Just to let you know, before starting a flame war, I have already contacted the upstream developers, that is TeX Live, and explained them the situation. I don’t see much chance for fixing, since the problem is with fonts without upstream and support, which are probably only used in Debian (I haven’t seen them anywhere else but some mentioning in RH), and which are not officially supported or distributed. It really needs a nice developer to look into why this breakage appeared. Let us hope. And instead of flaming, anyone here is invited to dig into the code him/herself and search for changes.

Additional information 2015-08-22 Just to back up my complaints and counteract several of the comments: I am quoting from an email of a colleague on the list where we are discussing the problem:

However, the fonts extended by Valek Filippov are quite problematic. The Type1 spec clearly requires that there may not exist two different fonts with the same /FontName. The modified fonts shipped with Ghostscript have the same /FontName as the original fonts donated by URW and not even the /UniqueID was changed. IMO they are broken because they don’t comply with the Type1 specification.

I hope that convinced also the last in doubt.

Email this to someonePrint this pageShare on FacebookShare on Google+Tweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedInFlattr the author

Tribute to Hermann Zapf

Last weekend Hermann Zapf, one of the greatest font designers and typographers of our times, has passed away at the age of 96. Much has been written about his life, his immense sphere of influence, his excellent typefaces, and some of the links to other obituaries can be found here at the end. There is nothing of value I can contribute, but let Hermann Zapf speak for himself with a few images from two books by or dedicated to him.

zapf-heart-blood-ink

Read on for more of his work …

Email this to someonePrint this pageShare on FacebookShare on Google+Tweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedInFlattr the author

Fixing (Debian, X, PDF viewer) font setup for Japanese

I have been experiencing crazy switches in my fonts displayed in the browser, in applications, etc. In particular, stuff written in Japanese was displayed with Chinese characters instead of Japanese. The differences are subtle, but they are there:

japanese-chinese

The problem in my case, but maybe in others, was a that by default Droid Sans Fallback font was used, which contains Chinese characters instead of Japanese. Read more for how to fix it!

Email this to someonePrint this pageShare on FacebookShare on Google+Tweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedInFlattr the author

Writing Japanese in LaTeX : Part 3 – Simple documents

After the bit technical part on characters and encodings, we continue this tutorial on writing Japanese in LaTeX today with a bit more hands-on practice, namely writing simple hello-world-style documents for different engines/packages.

nihongo-latex

Today’s part will also include a bit on how to setup your TeX environment using TeX Live to work with Japanese documents.
Continue reading

Email this to someonePrint this pageShare on FacebookShare on Google+Tweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedInFlattr the author