TUG 2013 – Closing

TUG 2013Closing remarks and report from the conference dinner of the TUG 2013 in Tokyo. For the first see TUG 2013 – Day 1, for the second TUG 2013 – Day 2, and for the third TUG 2013 – Day 3 Excursion, and for the last day TUG 2013 – Day 4.

Here now my last comments on the TUG conference in Tokyo. As it was my honor to close the conference I want to convey the same thoughts I tried to express during the closing address. Let us start with the hard facts: 141 active participants (at least), 35 interesting and funny talks, an excursion full of experiences, and not to forget the long chats during breaks, dinner, at any free time. It might be one of the best visited TUG conferences ever. I have only been at TUG 2012 in Boston, and only checked a few of the former conferences, but thanks to the huge interest in the Japanese TeX community the number of participants exceeded all our expectations.

But not only the number of participants, also the number of presentations – 35, some of them 1.5h tutorials – made for long and dense days. And in spite of these challenging schedule, most participants attended practically all the talks, even when we finished around 8pm. The variety of talks was not less than at any other TeX conference, something I really appreciate, one gets never bored.

Conference Dinner

After all the formal talks and greetings we changed over to another event, the conference dinner. Our excellent guide during the evening, Hayumi Ase, lead us through a program of speeches by Nelson Beebe, various toasts by Shinsaku Fujita, greetings from Haruhiko Okumura as the chair of the organizing committee, as well as a closing message by Barbara Beeton. All accompanied by excellent food and lots of drinks. Even after the Sambon-jime led by Yusuke Kuroki the drinking and partying continued until we had to leave the dinner location. A memorable conference dinner for a memorable conference!

At the end

It was the first time that the TUG conference came to Japan, and I remember well the first reaction of my Japanese colleagues to this proposal: “The Japanese side is not ready for this.” I think the conference showed all of us, the guests as well as the hosts, that the Japanese TeX users are very well prepared. In this sense my gratitude goes to all the Japanese TeX Users, and the Organizing Committee, the excellent lecturers and tutorial speakers, and all the participants.

My hope – and my feeling tells me I am not completely wrong – is that every participant could take home some great idea, some new knowledge, something that will improve, extend, diversify our TeX experience in the long run. For my side, this is definitely the case.

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TUG 2013 – Day 3 Excursion

TUG 2013Here now the recollections from the third day, the excursion day, of the TUG 2013 in Tokyo. For the first see TUG 2013 – Day 1, for the second see TUG 2013 – Day 2

The third day of the conference was dedicated to an excursion to the Tokyo Printing Museum housed in the Toppan Printing Company’s building. Divided into three groups we took turns in three activities: a guided tour through the museum, a letterpress printing workshop, and a calligraphy workshop.

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TUG 2013 – Day 1

TUG 2013I just returned from the TUG 2013 in Tokyo, a great event. Here are my personal comments on the different presentations and activities, starting with the first day.

First the cold facts: 4 days, 141+ participants, 35 presentations, 1 excursion, lots of fun. I haven’t been on many TUG Meetings before, but I guess that it was one of the well-visited ones.

So you want to know what you missed if you haven’t been there? Here are my short recollections!

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はじめの書道 My first calligraphy

先週の第34回TeX Users Group年次大会の遠足の時初めて書道触れた。その前筆を使う事がただ一度だった。今回自分で墨を作ってから、練習した。難しかった。思ったよりすごく難しかった!一回自分でやると、書道先生の天才を少しわかってきた。好きになったから、絶対に書道練習を続ける。

During last weeks 34. TeX Users’ Group Meeting we had the opportunity to try out calligraphy. Before that time I had touched a calligraphic pen only once. This time we could make our own ink and train writing. Wow, how difficult. Much more than I thought. Now that I tried it once, I start to understand the genius of the calligraphy masters. I will surely continue calligraphy!

はじめの書道

はじめの書道

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TUG 2013 in Tokyo – TeX Users Group Meeting

TUG 2013From Wednesday next week on the 34th Annual Meeting of the TeX Users Group will bring together over 150 TeX users, TeX experts, typographiles, book lovers, font designers, etc. A dense program with talks not only on TeX, but also Japanese writing systems, indexing, plotting, and much more.

For those who don’t know about TeX, that is what the TUG Intro page says:

TeX is a typesetting language. Instead of visually formatting your text, you enter your manuscript text intertwined with TeX commands in a plain text file. You then run TeX to produce formatted output, such as a PDF file. Thus, in contrast to standard word processors, your document is a separate file that does not pretend to be a representation of the final typeset output, and so can be easily edited and manipulated.

And if you believe that this paradigm doesn’t give itself to complex documents, take a look at our showcase, a collection of incredible things from math to linguistics, graphics, music, and much more.

Everyone is invite to join, on the spot registration is possible, even for one day. And of course you can enjoy a friendly atmosphere and interesting chats. (And you could even listen to myself giving two talks)

See you at TUG 2013 in Tokyo.

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