Systemd again (or how to obliterate your system)

Systemd again (or how to obliterate your system)

Ok, I have been silent about systemd and its being forced onto us in Debian like force-feeding Foie gras gooses. I have complained about systemd a few times (here and here), but what I read today really made me loose my last drips of trust I had in this monster-piece of software.

If you are up for some really surprising read about the main figure behind systemd, enjoy this github issue. It’s about a bug that simply does the equivalent of rm -rf / in some cases. The OP gave clear indications, the bug was fixes immediately, but then a comment from the God Poettering himself appeared that made the case drip over:

I am not sure I’d consider this much of a problem. Yeah, it’s a UNIX pitfall, but “rm -rf /foo/.*” will work the exact same way, no?Lennart Poettering, systemd issue 5644

Well, no, a total of 1min would have shown him that this is not the case. But we trust this guy the whole management of the init process, servers, logs (and soon our toilet and fridge management, X, DNS, whatever you ask for).

There are two issues here: One is that such a bug is lurking in systemd since probably years. The reason is simple – we pay with these kinds of bugs for the incredible complexity increase of the init process which takes over too much services. Referring back to the Turing Award lecture given by Hoare, we see that systemd took the later path:

I conclude that there are two ways of constructing a software design: One way is to make it so simple that there are obviously no deficiencies and the other way is to make it so complicated that there are no obvious deficiencies. Antony Hoare, Turing Award Lecture 1980

The other issue is how systemd developers deal with bug reports. I have reported several cases here, this is just another one: Close the issue for comments, shut up, put it under the carpet.

(Image credit: The musings of an Indian Faust)

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Systemd, Debian, and Hoare’s Turing Award Lecture

Recently the amount of flame-war discussions on debian-devel mailing list is again going up, due to the fact that systemd is finding (fighthing?) its way into all corners of the formerly peaceful Debian eco-system. In one of these threads a kind soul pointed the devs (systemd as well as Debian) at the Turing Award lecture of Antony Hoare, delivered in 1980.

debian-newspeak

And indeed, the lecture contains a collection of very interesting and important statements, not really surprising considering the importance of the Turing Award, as well as the influence Prof. Hoare had (and has!) in many areas of software development.

The quote that was sent to the debian-devel list, and hopefully be read and understood by both systemd and Debian/systemd devs, is the following:

I conclude that there are two ways of constructing a software design: One way is to make it so simple that there are obviously no deficiencies and the other way is to make it so complicated that there are no obvious deficiencies.

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